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20 questions

Dear PR folks… before you send me or other reporters, editors, bloggers your press release(s), answer these questions honestly…

1. Have you ever read anything that the reporter, editor or blogger has written?  If so, have they ever written anything about the topic/subject of your press release?

2. Is this breaking news, a really interesting story or something your client wants to tell others and you don’t have the nerve or knowledge or expertise to tell them that this is not newsworthy?

3.  Do you know if your client’s competitors have written on this topic ? If so, what angle did they take on it?  If not, why not?

4. Is the copy longer than 300-400 words? Can you make it shorter?

5. Are there any typos, grammatical or spelling errors?

6. Have you fact-checked all statistics and confirmed quotes?

7. Do you know how the reporter, editor or blogger prefers to be pitched?  Are you following their preferences?

8. Have you personalized the story/pitch to each reporter, editor or blogger?

9. Do you follow the reporter, editor or blogger on Twitter and know what they like to discuss so you can pitch them intelligently?

10. Is your pitch a sales pitch, advertising or news?  Do you know the difference?

11. Is the reporter, editor or blogger male or female?  Does that matter in how you approach them?

12. Have you included a phone number with your pitch in case the reporter, editor or blogger wants to talk to you?

13. Are you sending attachments with the press release?

14. Do you follow-up with the press release with numerous emails and phone calls?

15. Are the links accessible without having to register or subscribe to a website?

16. How is your timing?  Do you know the reporter, editor or blogger’s deadline?

17. Does your press release/pitch have an intriguing title/subject matter ?

18. Can you sum up the pitch/story message in ONE sentence/ or 30 seconds?

19. Is your message controversial, timely and/or a different take on a subject and adds to the topic/subject?

20. What is your client’s expertise about this topic?

Risky business: tips to starting a biz

Millions of people say they want to start a business. Some go ahead and do it. Others are all talk and no action. Why? Starting a business after you’ve been an employee all of your life can seem very scary. Fulfilling your dream can be thrilling, exciting and seem death defying. In this economy, many people have felt that they did not have a choice. Start a business or be permanently unemployed.

Below are some tips on how to take a few baby steps and maybe even get your baby business off the ground.

Risk-Averse Entrepreneur’s Guide to Startup Success

7 steps on how to launch a business…

“If you decide to go for it and start a business, be committed to it. If you’re not passionate about what you’re trying to do, you probably won’t stick out the inevitable bumps in the road.”

http://www.entrepreneur.com/blog/223215

Benefits of business: Tax write-offs

http://www.ehow.com/list_6747730_things-taxes-starting-new-business.html

Top Five Reasons To Establish Business Credit and Separate Personal From Business Credit
Even in these tough economic times establishing business credit can increase the chances that your business will stay afloat and help you beat the odds.

http://www.smallbusinessbrief.com/articles/creditmoney/002150.html

1000 Ways to Start a Business with $1,000 or Less

18. Create a newsletter that educates others

19. Create a Social Media following on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr, Digg, Reddit, Pinterest or elsewhere

(Note: Crucial to building a network of potential and actual customers/clients and getting the word out about your business)

45. Turn your job into a business. If you have a job now, see how you can turn your job skills into a business. If you keep the accounts accurate for your employer, you could start hiring your accounting and financial consulting services to other businesses in the area.

53. Decorate homes for the holidays. Everyone wants to have a pretty home for the holidays – lend a hand and earn some extra money doing it.

54. Decorate yards for special occasions such as birthdays and anniversaries.

55. Start a dog walker, pet sitter, pooper scooper business (Only if you love dogs!)

56. Start a Renovation Company. Are you an auto mechanic or computer geek? Then you probably have all the skills necessary to buy and sell used and renovated cars or computers.

57. Start a tutoring business! Teach another language, musical instrument, computer, cooking, chemistry, whatever you have to offer.

58. Start a massage business

59. Start an aromatherapy business

60. Start an intuitive counseling business

Note: Thanks to CeliaSue Hecht for contributing ideas #53-60. Learn more from her and email to get her E-Guide to getting cold hard cash in your wallet  

http://www.squidoo.com/1000-ways-to-start-a-business-with-1-000-or-less

How to use social media to promote your events 

http://www.slideshare.net/crainssocial/use-social-media-to-promote-your-events

If you want to learn how to create Buzz about your Book, Events, Business, give me a ring at 702-225-8206.

Tips to Maximize Your Publicity

Good advice from the Wealthy Bag Lady, Linda Hollander… 
  • Give surprising answers and new information. People love media guests who bust traditional myths and offer new insights.
  • Bring gifts for the interviewer and their team. If you have a book, this would be perfect.
  • Send a thank you right away.
  • Take a photo of you and the on-air talent
  • Put your media interviews on Social Media including YouTube.
  • Use celebrity photos, media and publicity on your web site, marketing materials, even your sponsor proposal.

Linda Hollander is the Author of  Bags to Riches and the founder of the Women’s Small Business Expo.

http://www.WealthyBagLady.com

if you would like assistance with your PR, feel free to contact me at prmatchmaker  at yahoo.com

Write a Book

Want the Best Business Card Ever?

Write a Book

Nearly every day, someone asks my advice on the best way to promote their business or themselves. I get the question at speaking engagements, at the office and, yes, sometimes at home. I don’t mind at all, because I’ve always got a good answer:

Write a book.

“A book?” some say — with obvious horror. “I’ve never written a book!”

Precisely my point. But let me back up a bit.

When I started EMSI 22 years ago, I soon realized the clients who got the attention of the media most quickly were those who’d written a book. Not just any book, mind you, but one that aligned with what they were promoting. The apple salesmen who wrote about apples were far more successful getting media coverage than those who wrote about oranges – and those who hadn’t written anything at all.

Why? Because yesterday’s business cards are today’s books. They give their authors immediate credibility, establishing them as experts in their fields. Credibility opens the door to journalists, talk show hosts, bloggers and anyone else creating content for hungry audiences. Who will they turn to as an expert source of information when a mysterious apple worm is destroying orchards? Johnny Appleseed, author of Red All Over – The Core of the Apple Industry.

There are some caveats. A poorly conceived, poorly designed, poorly written or poorly promoted book is worse than no book at all. Your book must capably and professionally represent your unique message – and you.

Not a writer? Not a problem. There are talented freelance writers and editors out there  who can help.  (Note: contact CeliaSue Hecht to discuss)…

 

 

The first step is planning, and that’s up to you whether or not you will actually do the writing.  

• Decide on your book’s main idea. The central focus will be what drives the entire project, so it must match the message you want to convey and it must excite you. If you’re bored from the get-go, you’ll likely never see your project through to the end. A great way to test ideas is by running them through these five questions:

1. What message am I enthusiastic about that I want to convey?
2. Who can benefit from it?
3. How will it help them?
4. Why am I the one bringing this idea to them?
5. How can I make my points unique and different from what has already been said on the topic?

• Pay attention to your own reactions as you test-drive your ideas. Which idea makes you smile? Which excites you creatively? Which hits the essence of what you’re about – what you enjoy, think about and create every day? It may be an idea you never even realized inspired such passion in you.

• Consider what you really want to achieve by promoting yourself or your business. Business owners obviously want to grow their business and see it flourish; some people want to build careers as speakers. But often, there’s something deeper driving us and we may not even be aware of it. Taking the time to do some soul-searching to identify your real motivation can help you clarify your message and find your book’s focus.

A real-life example: When I sat down to write Celebritize Yourself, I planned a how-to book on commonly asked publicity questions.  But, when I ran that idea through the five-question test, I had trouble with No. 5.  So, I asked myself, “What do I most enjoy about my professional life?” The answer was easy: helping people identify and value what’s unique about them and their message.  In writing a book about how to get publicity, I realized I needed to explain why everyone has an expertise that should be shared.

It’s never too late to write your book. I know it seems daunting, but remember, the first time you do anything, it’s often a challenge. Remember how hard it was wobbling down the sidewalk on your first bicycle? You may have crashed a few times, skinned your knees and bumped your head, but you got back on and kept trying.

Call on that brave 6-year-old you and start planning your book!

 

About Marsha Friedman

Marsha Friedman is a 22-year veteran of the public relations industry. She is the CEO of EMSI Public Relations (www.emsincorporated.com), a national firm that provides PR strategy and publicity services to corporations, entertainers, authors and professional firms. She also co-hosts “The News and Experts Radio Show with Alex and Marsha” on Sirius/XM Channel 131 on Saturdays at 5:00 PM EST.

13 Most Annoying Client Comments

 From a PR professionals perspective…

If you do not know why the comments below are unreasonable/insane, you do not understand the news business/cycle / media… and it would behoove you to LEARN. You could ask your PR professional to teach you, ask questions, take classes, educate yourself.

But the gist of this is that it is NOT up to PR professionals whether an article/story gets into the news / media or not no matter how hard they try or want or desire or beg. Bottom line, even if your PR professional does a Fantastic job, ultimately, the Editor/Newspaper Boss decides what goes into print. And if your PR Professional follows the RULES, does NOT send the media ads or advertorial copy disguised as news, has great contacts, and is persistent eventually their hard work will PAY OFF in lots of media coverage… AND it takes TIME, ENERGY and being in the WRITE Place at the Write Time…

Most people want to succeed, do a good job and make money, WIN WIN WIN… so STOP, LOOK, LISTEN and LEARN…

I wrote a few additional comments in parentheses…at the end of some…

http://www.72point.com/blog/our-top-13-most-annoying-client-comments

Ah clients….

They pay us the lovely money so we can’t be too mean about them…but sometimes they make us want to saw our heads off.

Here is our list of the most common, idiotic and maddening client comments we hear on a regular basis – and what we would LOVE to answer them with – if they didn’t pay us the lovely money…

1. “We really need this to make” – Oh, OK thanks for telling us because before you mentioned it, we weren’t planning on trying very hard.

2. ‘“Which papers are going to use the story?” – Um – whichever papers decide it’s OK and that they’ll use it?

3. “Do you know what the news agenda is like for June?” – Hang on a second *looks into crystal ball for updates on future murders, natural disasters etc*

4. “Sorry but the release can’t be sent unless the brand name is in the intro paragraph” – OK fine, let’s get absolutely no coverage for you whatsoever. Not any. Not even a Sun Spot.

5. “Do you guarantee coverage?” – Um, No. If you want guaranteed coverage – pay for an advert.

6. “Can you give me a reason WHY the story didn’t make?” Not unless I call every national news desk in the country and ask them directly, which will make us both look like complete tools.

7. “How many papers will the story make it into? – Hang on a second *looks deeply into crystal ball for updates on future murders, natural disasters etc*

8. “It’s what the brand people want, the story has to stay like that” – Grow a pair and tell them it’s crap – and then do your job by telling them how it’s actually going to work.

9. “Can we send the journalist a free gift to coincide with the story being distributed?” – Are you insane?  (sending a journalist a free gift/bribing an editor, is a good way to get BLACKLISTED)…

10. “Can you send this picture of the product out along with the story? –Are you COMPLETELY insane?   (NO Attachments unless reporter ASKS for one)

11. We need more information in the story about where you can buy the product? – Have you lost every single one of your marbles?  (Consider yourself LUCKY if the media prints your website link page or a phone number)

12. “We need to make sure we get page leads with this one” – Oh, OK – could you just hand me that silver wand?

13. At 4pm: “are you able to send this story out to the nationals today?” –Are you in an entirely different time zone?

http://www.aquiziam.com/quizzes/body_language_short.php

Happy New Year !

One  of the most important things for people who say they want to obtain publicity for their book or biz is knowing the who, what, where, when, why and how of pitching the media.

 

For the New Year, you might consider doing some coaching to set your New Year UP for Success.

 

You might learn a few things such as who are the best media contacts for YOU, when and how to approach them specifically and customized/personally, and what the benefits will do FOR YOU.

 

Just saying.

 

Now, I am listed as a freelance journalist on Cision (used to be Bacon’s) and every day I receive pitches from people just like you, who would like me to write about their book, product and/or service business and/or interview them.  Many of the pitches, too many, even from PR companies, unfortunately miss the mark.

 

Here’s an example, from a CEO who has an interesting product. And her pitch was for the upcoming New Year’s EVE holiday. I bought her pitch and immediately responded to the pitch (within half an hour). Too bad she was NOT at all READY nor prepared to receive a YES, all systems are GO. She wrote back to me saying that since her staff was gone for the holidays, she would have to send me a sample of the product AFTER the New Year. Anybody see the Problem here? Instead of OVERNIGHTING the product to me, she LOST out on an opportunity to get her product written about BEFORE New Year’s Eve. No PR, no sales.  If she sells her product to me via a pitch and then DOES NOT DELIVER, how does that bode for her customers and her business? Not good news.

 

If/when you send out press releases and/or pitches to the media, bloggers, reporters, editors and so on, BE PREPARED and READY TO GO. Otherwise, you are spinning your wheels and wasting people’s time. And busy bloggers, reporters and editors DO NOT like having their time wasted.

 

Just saying.

 

Call or email me if you’d like to do some PR coaching to Set UP your New Year for Success.  Good reasons to Celebrate.

 

 

 

gobble up these turkeys

there are badly written press releases and there are worse than bad, here are 25 turkeys … press releases my dog would not even eat up… would not touch with a 10 foot pole… (and she will eat anything and everything)…

Here are seven reasons why these news releases fail:

  • No news – totally lacking in “news” value for readers or audiences.
  • Headline sucks – without a great headline, your news release is headed to the waste basket fast.
  • Crammed with corporate-speak – your CEO may like his quote but if it sounds silly, it is!
  • Filled with marketing-speak – a news release is not a marketing brochure.
  • Poorly written, badly edited, terrible grammar – remember, you’re pitching people who write and deliver news for a living.
  • Loaded with techno-babble – geek-speak reeks.
  • Did I mention “no news?”

http://www.theprcoach.com/bad-news-releases-25-press-release-turkeys/

This one features a too long first sentence and the headline is blah blah blah… if you do not know what a Target of Opportunity is you are gone. This book is supposed to be Action Packed Thriller… So write the Press Release the same way, with SHORT exciting sentences, duh…  Plus, this PR person sent me eight other press releases all in the same day. Don’t email blast me all of your press releases no matter the subject matter. Consider what the reporter/editor writes about. Otherwise, BIG FAT WASTE OF TIME. I’d NEVER read a book like this nor write a review of one. And the other releases range in subject matter from Uncle Al Capone to small business tips, Big Medicine and Family Court and party planning. Hello, is anybody discerning?  I DO NOT write about all of those topics. Nor will I interview all of those ‘experts.’

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Just When You Think It Can’t Get Deadlier – Another Radical Force Joins The Assault On Targets of Opportunity in the U.S.

Greenwich, CT, November 23, 2011 – In Targets of Deception, which suspense master Robert K. Tanenbaum called “a fast-paced thriller,” we were introduced to CIA agent Jordan Sandor in a story praised by bestselling author Steve Alten as “terrific.”  Now Sandor is back in Jeffrey S. Stephens’s riveting Targets of Opportunity (Gallery Books; August 30, 2011; $24.00), playing for bigger stakes and facing deadlier challenges.

Whisked from his Manhattan townhouse to a gabled CIA safe house in Virginia, Sandor faces off with a top terrorist agent from Iran’s Revolutionary Guard. In exchange for protection from his own side, Ahmad Jaber is offering the CIA explosive information: word of a secret, unholy alliance forged among operatives in the Middle East, a ruthless South American, and Kim Jong-II’s North Korea. Jaber claims not to know specific details, only that the strike will target the heart of America.

the dog is having a snooze fest… no doubt dreaming of eating turkey…

Contrast the above turkey to this one from another PR…  I would shorten the title but the rest tells me all I need to know. The book also is NOT something that I’d read nor write about though.

 

18 stories by top romance authors celebrating

the heroic men of the Navy SEALs

 

Honor, courage, loyalty and passion combine in these suspenseful, romantic and sentimental tales about the SEALs and the women who love them.

 

Honor, duty, courage, passion . . . the men of the Navy SEALs are a special breed of hero, and in these stories by eighteen top romance authors these heroes are celebrated not only as symbols of devoted service to their country but as the kind of man every woman wants to love. They’ll rescue a damsel in distress and her lap dog, too. They’ll battle hometown dramas and international bad guys. When it comes to giving away their hearts, they’ll risk everything.

All proceeds from sales of SEAL of My Dreamsgoes to the Veterans Research Corporation, a non-profit fundraiser for veterans’ medical research.

Purchase a copy for yourself or your friend here!

 

 

authors just wanna have fun

List of New York Times reporters/editors on twitter you can follow…

http://twitter.com/#!/nytimes/nyt-journalists/members

Follow John Kremer’s Book marketing tweets and you can get a lot of worthwhile info including editors and publications who do book reviews on various topics such as these:

Bon Appetit Magazine – editors and columnists – http://magagenie.com/bon-appetit-magazine

ESPN the Magazine – sports editors and columnists – http://magagenie.com/espn-the-magazine

Executive Travel Magazine – editors and contributing editors – http://magagenie.com/executive-travel-magazine

Forbes Magazine – editors and columnists – http://magagenie.com/forbes-magazine

IDEA Fitness Journal – health, fitness, and wellness editors – http://magagenie.com/idea-fitness-journal

Internet Retailer Magazine – Internet marketing magazine – http://magagenie.com/internet-retailer-magazine

Organic Gardening Magazine – editors and contributing editors – http://magagenie.com/organic-gardening-magazine

Outside Magazine – editors and book reviewers – http://magagenie.com/outside-magazine

Vogue Magazine – editors and columnists updated – http://magagenie.com/vogue-magazine

Wild West Magazine – history editors and history book reviewers – http://magagenie.com/wild-west-magazine

Wired Magazine – editors and online writers – http://magagenie.com/wired-magazine

The above are just some of the tweets John sent out during the past month.

Follow his tweets at http://twitter.com/johnkremer

if you have a book, here are four tips Kremer suggests you follow to promote your book:

Here are the top four book promotion activities you can engage in to sell more books in today’s world . . .

1. Speak. Speaking builds a word-of-mouth army better than anything else. Speak locally – at garden clubs, libraries, bookstores, Rotary clubs, JCs, poetry nights, story swaps, book club meetings, etc. Then expand out to a wider area, to nearby cities, to nearby states. Eventually, expand out to an even wider audience.

When someone hears you speak, they become a bigger fan than if they had just read your book. If they like you when they hear you speak, they will tell ten times more people than by just reading your book.

2. Book yourself on national TV. TV is still the largest mass market media. It still reaches more people than any other media – and with more impact. It’s worth spending the time contacting the ten or twenty news and talk shows that reach your audience. For most national TV shows, you can get the contact information in one of two ways: 1. from their websites, and 2. via your network of friends and fellow authors.

Your appearance on one major TV show will not only expose you to millions of viewers, but it also opens the door to dozens and sometimes hundreds of other media: newspapers, magazines, radio, more TV shows, etc.

3. Create relationships with high-traffic websites. How many major high-traffic websites that attract your target reader have you created relationships with? Are these real relationships where you contribute content to them on a regular basis? In today’s world, Internet relationships are the key to marketing success.

Uncover five to ten top websites that already reach the audience you want to reach. Look over their sites until you find a way to contact someone behind the site – a webmaster, an editor, the founder. Then email them with an offer of free content for their readers: an interview with you, a review copy of your book, a free article (that is really good), some tips for their readers, a Q&A column on your specialty, etc. Their obligation, in return, is to link to your website or sales page.

4. Do a Superstar Blog Tour. Or a Mega Blog Tour. Or a Blogpalooza. I’m not talking about the old-style humdrum virtual book tour of 15 or 20 blogs. I’m talking about an event blog tour that creates Internet buzz on a major scale. Event blog tours can build brands, create incredible website traffic, and sell tons of books.

In addition, Outskirts Press offers these five ways to promote your books for the holiday season…

http://selfpublishingnews.com/2011/10/10/5-ways-self-publishing-authors-can-promote-their-book-for-the-holidays/

Media shy or Media magnet?

You don’t have to be a Big Star, famous celebrity, politician, singer or movie actor/actress to garner interviews in local or national newspapers, magazines, or blogs and other online publications. If you are an author or business owner who simply would like the media to give you a bit of attention, do a book or product review, quote you in a story or article they’re working on or perhaps have an editor publish your opinion or article in their publication, then read on about how to accomplish this daunting feat.

Some people approach obtaining media attention as if there is something magical, mysterious and/or weird about it (and therefore, there is NOTHING for them to do or learn or educate themselves about). Others shy away from all mention of their name in public. And some folks are hams who are greedy hogs who eat up all the media attention they can get. Most people fall somewhere in between these extremes.

If your business or book could use a boost from some exposure, then here are some tips on how to get the job done without too much muss and fuss.

Fundamentals

Do you have a website? Is your website media friendly? Does your website have your contact info easily portrayed on every page (email, cell and other phone numbers)? Is there a media coverage/press page where you feature press releases, articles, and/or clippings of coverage that you’ve already received?

Are you able to write a press release that gets published?

A press release requires a certain format. A catchy headline. The first paragraph should offer the Who, What, Where, How and Why of the story… a few good quotes, startling statistics, and/or a counterintuitive question to start the conversation.

Imagine that you are at a party and want to talk to a reporter/editor. How do you begin? What might you say to capture their attention? Are you bragging, begging or boring? Is your elevator speech a whodunit, leaves a lasting impression and/or funny but succinct? Can you start with a funny quote or startling statistic? Do you think anyone would want to know more or are you so full of your own jargon that you can hardly talk to regular humans?  Is your  subject matter appropriate for the person you are speaking with or is it old, out of date and who cares?

More about writing press releases

http://ezinearticles.com/?Youve-Got-the-Power-to-Write-Press-Releases-that-Get-Published&id=977808

Do you know how and who to pitch your story to the media?

Is your pitch perfect or fatally flawed? Pitching the media your story is not a slam dunk. It requires research, a newsworthy relevant story, and excellent communication skills.  Have you got what it takes?

https://sites.google.com/site/celiasueink/do-you-have-perfect-pitch

Do you know the process?

1. Write a WOW of a press release/pitch

2. Research who to send it to (compile a list) and when

3. Individualize/customize the press release/pitch

4. Send out your press release/pitch

5. Follow up follow up follow up

6. Results… publish on your website and send to other clients, friends, family, associates

If not, revise, edit and review and start the process again…

7. Create a regular, ongoing, scheduled time of the day, week or month for pitching the media.  Media Coverage accrues over time…

And once you get the Media Coverage, what you DO WITH IT, COUNTS… here’s Brian Tracy on this very important subject:

http://www.briantracy.com/blog/general/how-to-get-on-tv-understanding-direct-media-media/utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+BrianTracysBlog+%28Brian+Tracy%27s+Blog%29

 

Getting to know you… Getting to know all about you… Getting to like you… Getting to hope you like me… you are precisely my cup of tea !

when should you answer a reporter’s call?

http://www.mrmediatraining.com/index.php/2010/08/25/whats-your-deadline/

editor or proofreader?

The lines can seem blurry… what is the difference between proofreading and editing, you wonder, scratching your head.

Should you hire an editor or a proofreader for your manuscript (book)?  Often writers with limited funds make decisions upon the fee quoted rather than on what they require for the project. These days agents and publishers expect a professionally edited and proofread manuscript. They also expect writers to promote their own books.  It can seem confusing and daunting where to go and what to do next. You’ve written a draft or you’ve written and revised and edited and need a second pair of eyes to look at your material. Now what?

In this competitive world, it is important to know the difference between editing and proofreading and act accordingly.

The difference between the tasks of an Editor and a Proofreader can be compared to the services of a professional dog trainer such as Victoria Stilwell and a dog walker. The former has many years of practical experience, a multitude of resources, tools and techniques at her fingertips and invaluable connections in the book publishing industry, media and other related fields. Editing involves more time, energy and work and a broader range of skills, and can take longer to edit a piece of written material than it does to proofread. The latter is a task that involves checking for typos, grammatical mistakes, spelling errors, and punctuation. It takes a certain amount of practice, experience and training to proofread effectively. Proofreaders point out the errors according to a style guide usually.

An editor also proofreads plus rewrites material, makes suggestions for revisions, moving Chapter 23 to Chapter 1 or vice versa (move material around) and goes beyond checking for mechanical errors. An editor checks for readability, fact checks, and suggests additions and deletions to the material. An editor seeks to make sure that the artistic integrity of your written material is maintained. In other words, an editor has a grasp for the entire bigger picture while a proofreader focuses more narrowly upon words and sentences and paragraphs rather than the entire manuscript and its intended purpose.

An editor also is a creative partner, working closely with the writer. The editor seeks to fulfill the writers expectations of creating the best book possible while a proofreader has more of a piecemeal focus and approach.

Depending upon the goals, intention and expectations of the writer, ie, to produce a more polished piece of work in order to get it published,  or to hone the material to take it to the next level, will determine whether an editor or a proofreader is the right person for the job at hand. So it is important for the writer to know the difference between the jobs to know what they require.

The ultimate responsibility to accept or reject each correction or edit is in the hands of the writer.  Don’t skimp on your project by hiring a proofreader when you require the skill and expertise of an editor. And if you seek only proofreading services not editing, make that clear to the person that you hire.

If you have any questions or comments or experiences to share, please do tell. Thanks.