Archives

Write a Book

Want the Best Business Card Ever?

Write a Book

Nearly every day, someone asks my advice on the best way to promote their business or themselves. I get the question at speaking engagements, at the office and, yes, sometimes at home. I don’t mind at all, because I’ve always got a good answer:

Write a book.

“A book?” some say — with obvious horror. “I’ve never written a book!”

Precisely my point. But let me back up a bit.

When I started EMSI 22 years ago, I soon realized the clients who got the attention of the media most quickly were those who’d written a book. Not just any book, mind you, but one that aligned with what they were promoting. The apple salesmen who wrote about apples were far more successful getting media coverage than those who wrote about oranges – and those who hadn’t written anything at all.

Why? Because yesterday’s business cards are today’s books. They give their authors immediate credibility, establishing them as experts in their fields. Credibility opens the door to journalists, talk show hosts, bloggers and anyone else creating content for hungry audiences. Who will they turn to as an expert source of information when a mysterious apple worm is destroying orchards? Johnny Appleseed, author of Red All Over – The Core of the Apple Industry.

There are some caveats. A poorly conceived, poorly designed, poorly written or poorly promoted book is worse than no book at all. Your book must capably and professionally represent your unique message – and you.

Not a writer? Not a problem. There are talented freelance writers and editors out there  who can help.  (Note: contact CeliaSue Hecht to discuss)…

 

 

The first step is planning, and that’s up to you whether or not you will actually do the writing.  

• Decide on your book’s main idea. The central focus will be what drives the entire project, so it must match the message you want to convey and it must excite you. If you’re bored from the get-go, you’ll likely never see your project through to the end. A great way to test ideas is by running them through these five questions:

1. What message am I enthusiastic about that I want to convey?
2. Who can benefit from it?
3. How will it help them?
4. Why am I the one bringing this idea to them?
5. How can I make my points unique and different from what has already been said on the topic?

• Pay attention to your own reactions as you test-drive your ideas. Which idea makes you smile? Which excites you creatively? Which hits the essence of what you’re about – what you enjoy, think about and create every day? It may be an idea you never even realized inspired such passion in you.

• Consider what you really want to achieve by promoting yourself or your business. Business owners obviously want to grow their business and see it flourish; some people want to build careers as speakers. But often, there’s something deeper driving us and we may not even be aware of it. Taking the time to do some soul-searching to identify your real motivation can help you clarify your message and find your book’s focus.

A real-life example: When I sat down to write Celebritize Yourself, I planned a how-to book on commonly asked publicity questions.  But, when I ran that idea through the five-question test, I had trouble with No. 5.  So, I asked myself, “What do I most enjoy about my professional life?” The answer was easy: helping people identify and value what’s unique about them and their message.  In writing a book about how to get publicity, I realized I needed to explain why everyone has an expertise that should be shared.

It’s never too late to write your book. I know it seems daunting, but remember, the first time you do anything, it’s often a challenge. Remember how hard it was wobbling down the sidewalk on your first bicycle? You may have crashed a few times, skinned your knees and bumped your head, but you got back on and kept trying.

Call on that brave 6-year-old you and start planning your book!

 

About Marsha Friedman

Marsha Friedman is a 22-year veteran of the public relations industry. She is the CEO of EMSI Public Relations (www.emsincorporated.com), a national firm that provides PR strategy and publicity services to corporations, entertainers, authors and professional firms. She also co-hosts “The News and Experts Radio Show with Alex and Marsha” on Sirius/XM Channel 131 on Saturdays at 5:00 PM EST.

A Book Guardian Angel…

Let a Book Guardian Angel assist you in Getting Published NOW

The Power is in YOUR Hands…

Definition of Author:

An originator or creator or initiator…

To assume responsibility for the content of (a published text).

GET PUBLISHED NOW

* Obtain a Literary Agent and/or Traditional Publisher OR Self-Publish

* Write like a Professional Writer

* Become published while promoting your business 

CeliaSue Hecht, the book guardian angel, is a Journalist with a special interest in Angel to Zen topics including pets (shaggy dog tales), fairy tales, healing tales and chocolate. Her work has been featured in 40+ publications (newspapers & magazines).  She has interviewed, promoted and worked with celebrities and best-selling authors such as John Robbins, Debbie Reynolds, Dr. Patch Adams, Dr. Wayne Dyer, Dr. Jacob Teitelbaum, and others. Has co-authored five romantic travel guides and one e-dog travel guide. She has also led seminars and workshops in the US and Europe. 

Free consultation… 702-225-8206

gobble up these turkeys

there are badly written press releases and there are worse than bad, here are 25 turkeys … press releases my dog would not even eat up… would not touch with a 10 foot pole… (and she will eat anything and everything)…

Here are seven reasons why these news releases fail:

  • No news – totally lacking in “news” value for readers or audiences.
  • Headline sucks – without a great headline, your news release is headed to the waste basket fast.
  • Crammed with corporate-speak – your CEO may like his quote but if it sounds silly, it is!
  • Filled with marketing-speak – a news release is not a marketing brochure.
  • Poorly written, badly edited, terrible grammar – remember, you’re pitching people who write and deliver news for a living.
  • Loaded with techno-babble – geek-speak reeks.
  • Did I mention “no news?”

http://www.theprcoach.com/bad-news-releases-25-press-release-turkeys/

This one features a too long first sentence and the headline is blah blah blah… if you do not know what a Target of Opportunity is you are gone. This book is supposed to be Action Packed Thriller… So write the Press Release the same way, with SHORT exciting sentences, duh…  Plus, this PR person sent me eight other press releases all in the same day. Don’t email blast me all of your press releases no matter the subject matter. Consider what the reporter/editor writes about. Otherwise, BIG FAT WASTE OF TIME. I’d NEVER read a book like this nor write a review of one. And the other releases range in subject matter from Uncle Al Capone to small business tips, Big Medicine and Family Court and party planning. Hello, is anybody discerning?  I DO NOT write about all of those topics. Nor will I interview all of those ‘experts.’

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Just When You Think It Can’t Get Deadlier – Another Radical Force Joins The Assault On Targets of Opportunity in the U.S.

Greenwich, CT, November 23, 2011 – In Targets of Deception, which suspense master Robert K. Tanenbaum called “a fast-paced thriller,” we were introduced to CIA agent Jordan Sandor in a story praised by bestselling author Steve Alten as “terrific.”  Now Sandor is back in Jeffrey S. Stephens’s riveting Targets of Opportunity (Gallery Books; August 30, 2011; $24.00), playing for bigger stakes and facing deadlier challenges.

Whisked from his Manhattan townhouse to a gabled CIA safe house in Virginia, Sandor faces off with a top terrorist agent from Iran’s Revolutionary Guard. In exchange for protection from his own side, Ahmad Jaber is offering the CIA explosive information: word of a secret, unholy alliance forged among operatives in the Middle East, a ruthless South American, and Kim Jong-II’s North Korea. Jaber claims not to know specific details, only that the strike will target the heart of America.

the dog is having a snooze fest… no doubt dreaming of eating turkey…

Contrast the above turkey to this one from another PR…  I would shorten the title but the rest tells me all I need to know. The book also is NOT something that I’d read nor write about though.

 

18 stories by top romance authors celebrating

the heroic men of the Navy SEALs

 

Honor, courage, loyalty and passion combine in these suspenseful, romantic and sentimental tales about the SEALs and the women who love them.

 

Honor, duty, courage, passion . . . the men of the Navy SEALs are a special breed of hero, and in these stories by eighteen top romance authors these heroes are celebrated not only as symbols of devoted service to their country but as the kind of man every woman wants to love. They’ll rescue a damsel in distress and her lap dog, too. They’ll battle hometown dramas and international bad guys. When it comes to giving away their hearts, they’ll risk everything.

All proceeds from sales of SEAL of My Dreamsgoes to the Veterans Research Corporation, a non-profit fundraiser for veterans’ medical research.

Purchase a copy for yourself or your friend here!

 

 

authors just wanna have fun

List of New York Times reporters/editors on twitter you can follow…

http://twitter.com/#!/nytimes/nyt-journalists/members

Follow John Kremer’s Book marketing tweets and you can get a lot of worthwhile info including editors and publications who do book reviews on various topics such as these:

Bon Appetit Magazine – editors and columnists – http://magagenie.com/bon-appetit-magazine

ESPN the Magazine – sports editors and columnists – http://magagenie.com/espn-the-magazine

Executive Travel Magazine – editors and contributing editors – http://magagenie.com/executive-travel-magazine

Forbes Magazine – editors and columnists – http://magagenie.com/forbes-magazine

IDEA Fitness Journal – health, fitness, and wellness editors – http://magagenie.com/idea-fitness-journal

Internet Retailer Magazine – Internet marketing magazine – http://magagenie.com/internet-retailer-magazine

Organic Gardening Magazine – editors and contributing editors – http://magagenie.com/organic-gardening-magazine

Outside Magazine – editors and book reviewers – http://magagenie.com/outside-magazine

Vogue Magazine – editors and columnists updated – http://magagenie.com/vogue-magazine

Wild West Magazine – history editors and history book reviewers – http://magagenie.com/wild-west-magazine

Wired Magazine – editors and online writers – http://magagenie.com/wired-magazine

The above are just some of the tweets John sent out during the past month.

Follow his tweets at http://twitter.com/johnkremer

if you have a book, here are four tips Kremer suggests you follow to promote your book:

Here are the top four book promotion activities you can engage in to sell more books in today’s world . . .

1. Speak. Speaking builds a word-of-mouth army better than anything else. Speak locally – at garden clubs, libraries, bookstores, Rotary clubs, JCs, poetry nights, story swaps, book club meetings, etc. Then expand out to a wider area, to nearby cities, to nearby states. Eventually, expand out to an even wider audience.

When someone hears you speak, they become a bigger fan than if they had just read your book. If they like you when they hear you speak, they will tell ten times more people than by just reading your book.

2. Book yourself on national TV. TV is still the largest mass market media. It still reaches more people than any other media – and with more impact. It’s worth spending the time contacting the ten or twenty news and talk shows that reach your audience. For most national TV shows, you can get the contact information in one of two ways: 1. from their websites, and 2. via your network of friends and fellow authors.

Your appearance on one major TV show will not only expose you to millions of viewers, but it also opens the door to dozens and sometimes hundreds of other media: newspapers, magazines, radio, more TV shows, etc.

3. Create relationships with high-traffic websites. How many major high-traffic websites that attract your target reader have you created relationships with? Are these real relationships where you contribute content to them on a regular basis? In today’s world, Internet relationships are the key to marketing success.

Uncover five to ten top websites that already reach the audience you want to reach. Look over their sites until you find a way to contact someone behind the site – a webmaster, an editor, the founder. Then email them with an offer of free content for their readers: an interview with you, a review copy of your book, a free article (that is really good), some tips for their readers, a Q&A column on your specialty, etc. Their obligation, in return, is to link to your website or sales page.

4. Do a Superstar Blog Tour. Or a Mega Blog Tour. Or a Blogpalooza. I’m not talking about the old-style humdrum virtual book tour of 15 or 20 blogs. I’m talking about an event blog tour that creates Internet buzz on a major scale. Event blog tours can build brands, create incredible website traffic, and sell tons of books.

In addition, Outskirts Press offers these five ways to promote your books for the holiday season…

http://selfpublishingnews.com/2011/10/10/5-ways-self-publishing-authors-can-promote-their-book-for-the-holidays/

editor or proofreader?

The lines can seem blurry… what is the difference between proofreading and editing, you wonder, scratching your head.

Should you hire an editor or a proofreader for your manuscript (book)?  Often writers with limited funds make decisions upon the fee quoted rather than on what they require for the project. These days agents and publishers expect a professionally edited and proofread manuscript. They also expect writers to promote their own books.  It can seem confusing and daunting where to go and what to do next. You’ve written a draft or you’ve written and revised and edited and need a second pair of eyes to look at your material. Now what?

In this competitive world, it is important to know the difference between editing and proofreading and act accordingly.

The difference between the tasks of an Editor and a Proofreader can be compared to the services of a professional dog trainer such as Victoria Stilwell and a dog walker. The former has many years of practical experience, a multitude of resources, tools and techniques at her fingertips and invaluable connections in the book publishing industry, media and other related fields. Editing involves more time, energy and work and a broader range of skills, and can take longer to edit a piece of written material than it does to proofread. The latter is a task that involves checking for typos, grammatical mistakes, spelling errors, and punctuation. It takes a certain amount of practice, experience and training to proofread effectively. Proofreaders point out the errors according to a style guide usually.

An editor also proofreads plus rewrites material, makes suggestions for revisions, moving Chapter 23 to Chapter 1 or vice versa (move material around) and goes beyond checking for mechanical errors. An editor checks for readability, fact checks, and suggests additions and deletions to the material. An editor seeks to make sure that the artistic integrity of your written material is maintained. In other words, an editor has a grasp for the entire bigger picture while a proofreader focuses more narrowly upon words and sentences and paragraphs rather than the entire manuscript and its intended purpose.

An editor also is a creative partner, working closely with the writer. The editor seeks to fulfill the writers expectations of creating the best book possible while a proofreader has more of a piecemeal focus and approach.

Depending upon the goals, intention and expectations of the writer, ie, to produce a more polished piece of work in order to get it published,  or to hone the material to take it to the next level, will determine whether an editor or a proofreader is the right person for the job at hand. So it is important for the writer to know the difference between the jobs to know what they require.

The ultimate responsibility to accept or reject each correction or edit is in the hands of the writer.  Don’t skimp on your project by hiring a proofreader when you require the skill and expertise of an editor. And if you seek only proofreading services not editing, make that clear to the person that you hire.

If you have any questions or comments or experiences to share, please do tell. Thanks.