Archive | October 2011

Media shy or Media magnet?

You don’t have to be a Big Star, famous celebrity, politician, singer or movie actor/actress to garner interviews in local or national newspapers, magazines, or blogs and other online publications. If you are an author or business owner who simply would like the media to give you a bit of attention, do a book or product review, quote you in a story or article they’re working on or perhaps have an editor publish your opinion or article in their publication, then read on about how to accomplish this daunting feat.

Some people approach obtaining media attention as if there is something magical, mysterious and/or weird about it (and therefore, there is NOTHING for them to do or learn or educate themselves about). Others shy away from all mention of their name in public. And some folks are hams who are greedy hogs who eat up all the media attention they can get. Most people fall somewhere in between these extremes.

If your business or book could use a boost from some exposure, then here are some tips on how to get the job done without too much muss and fuss.

Fundamentals

Do you have a website? Is your website media friendly? Does your website have your contact info easily portrayed on every page (email, cell and other phone numbers)? Is there a media coverage/press page where you feature press releases, articles, and/or clippings of coverage that you’ve already received?

Are you able to write a press release that gets published?

A press release requires a certain format. A catchy headline. The first paragraph should offer the Who, What, Where, How and Why of the story… a few good quotes, startling statistics, and/or a counterintuitive question to start the conversation.

Imagine that you are at a party and want to talk to a reporter/editor. How do you begin? What might you say to capture their attention? Are you bragging, begging or boring? Is your elevator speech a whodunit, leaves a lasting impression and/or funny but succinct? Can you start with a funny quote or startling statistic? Do you think anyone would want to know more or are you so full of your own jargon that you can hardly talk to regular humans?  Is your  subject matter appropriate for the person you are speaking with or is it old, out of date and who cares?

More about writing press releases

http://ezinearticles.com/?Youve-Got-the-Power-to-Write-Press-Releases-that-Get-Published&id=977808

Do you know how and who to pitch your story to the media?

Is your pitch perfect or fatally flawed? Pitching the media your story is not a slam dunk. It requires research, a newsworthy relevant story, and excellent communication skills.  Have you got what it takes?

https://sites.google.com/site/celiasueink/do-you-have-perfect-pitch

Do you know the process?

1. Write a WOW of a press release/pitch

2. Research who to send it to (compile a list) and when

3. Individualize/customize the press release/pitch

4. Send out your press release/pitch

5. Follow up follow up follow up

6. Results… publish on your website and send to other clients, friends, family, associates

If not, revise, edit and review and start the process again…

7. Create a regular, ongoing, scheduled time of the day, week or month for pitching the media.  Media Coverage accrues over time…

And once you get the Media Coverage, what you DO WITH IT, COUNTS… here’s Brian Tracy on this very important subject:

http://www.briantracy.com/blog/general/how-to-get-on-tv-understanding-direct-media-media/utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+BrianTracysBlog+%28Brian+Tracy%27s+Blog%29

 

Getting to know you… Getting to know all about you… Getting to like you… Getting to hope you like me… you are precisely my cup of tea !

when should you answer a reporter’s call?

http://www.mrmediatraining.com/index.php/2010/08/25/whats-your-deadline/

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editor or proofreader?

The lines can seem blurry… what is the difference between proofreading and editing, you wonder, scratching your head.

Should you hire an editor or a proofreader for your manuscript (book)?  Often writers with limited funds make decisions upon the fee quoted rather than on what they require for the project. These days agents and publishers expect a professionally edited and proofread manuscript. They also expect writers to promote their own books.  It can seem confusing and daunting where to go and what to do next. You’ve written a draft or you’ve written and revised and edited and need a second pair of eyes to look at your material. Now what?

In this competitive world, it is important to know the difference between editing and proofreading and act accordingly.

The difference between the tasks of an Editor and a Proofreader can be compared to the services of a professional dog trainer such as Victoria Stilwell and a dog walker. The former has many years of practical experience, a multitude of resources, tools and techniques at her fingertips and invaluable connections in the book publishing industry, media and other related fields. Editing involves more time, energy and work and a broader range of skills, and can take longer to edit a piece of written material than it does to proofread. The latter is a task that involves checking for typos, grammatical mistakes, spelling errors, and punctuation. It takes a certain amount of practice, experience and training to proofread effectively. Proofreaders point out the errors according to a style guide usually.

An editor also proofreads plus rewrites material, makes suggestions for revisions, moving Chapter 23 to Chapter 1 or vice versa (move material around) and goes beyond checking for mechanical errors. An editor checks for readability, fact checks, and suggests additions and deletions to the material. An editor seeks to make sure that the artistic integrity of your written material is maintained. In other words, an editor has a grasp for the entire bigger picture while a proofreader focuses more narrowly upon words and sentences and paragraphs rather than the entire manuscript and its intended purpose.

An editor also is a creative partner, working closely with the writer. The editor seeks to fulfill the writers expectations of creating the best book possible while a proofreader has more of a piecemeal focus and approach.

Depending upon the goals, intention and expectations of the writer, ie, to produce a more polished piece of work in order to get it published,  or to hone the material to take it to the next level, will determine whether an editor or a proofreader is the right person for the job at hand. So it is important for the writer to know the difference between the jobs to know what they require.

The ultimate responsibility to accept or reject each correction or edit is in the hands of the writer.  Don’t skimp on your project by hiring a proofreader when you require the skill and expertise of an editor. And if you seek only proofreading services not editing, make that clear to the person that you hire.

If you have any questions or comments or experiences to share, please do tell. Thanks.